Wednesday Working – Table Runner Dots and Starting a Marquetry Project

Mostly I haven’t been doing much other than Christmas stuff the last two weeks, but I’m getting back into project mode. First, here is the current progress on the table runner:

I’ve completed the 16 blocks that make the four dots of the runner. It’s 48″ long and 12″ wide. The next step is to sew all the blocks together and add the borders. Hopefully that will be easier than making the blocks.

I turned the heater on in my outside shed and am starting on a marquetry project. I’ve always wanted to create some marquetry based on patterns in my quilting so I took the pattern for my last quilt, the bento box and started to work on a drink coaster:

This is the prototype using two kinds of veneers. This one will hit the trash can soon as it’s just full of problems, but I learned a lot making this one. The biggest problem is the accuracy needed to create this pattern. I cut this one mostly freehand with the aid of a ruler and found it difficult to do. I also got the scale wrong and this is 6″ by 6″ inches or about twice the size of a normal coaster. The most important thing to me isn’t that I made mistakes, but that I did something and now have a better idea one how to do the next one.

The next step here is adjusting the size of the pattern and bringing out my precision tools to cut the next set of parts.

This is my chop it tool that will help me cut 90 degree angles. I bought this a few years ago.

I call this my “third hand.” it’s used to cut strips of veneer to precise widths. I made a number of years ago and use it all the time. You’ll note that the green mat here is in fact a quilter’s cutting mat – I have found a number of my tools are useful in both the workshop and sewing room. and yes, I have two steam irons, one for quilting and one for marquetry.

That’s it for this week. We’ve just started to put the Christmas decorations away, so if you need me – I’ll be untangling the lights from the tree.

About Andrew Reynolds

Born in California Did the school thing studying electronics, computers, release engineering and literary criticism. I worked in the high tech world doing software release engineering and am now retired. Then I got prostate cancer. Now I am a blogger and work in my wood shop doing scroll saw work and marquetry.
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16 Responses to Wednesday Working – Table Runner Dots and Starting a Marquetry Project

  1. Marquetry is so precise! It is going to be beautiful, for sure! I love the quilt squares, too! It will be lovely! Happy New Year to you!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I always enjoy seeing your projects, and especially your tools. I’ve never done marquetry, so I’m quite interested in your process. I have done quilting, though, and I’m in awe of your table-runner-to-be. It looks great already! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Dave says:

    I have a “chop-it” tool for paper (a blade running down a fixed track), which is a much cleaner approach than scissors. I am all about straight lines.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Table runner looks bright and beautiful. Enjoyed seeing your other new project too,

    Liked by 1 person

  5. jfwknifton says:

    You never get things wrong when you’re experimenting. They are actually “opportunities to learn”.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. SusanR says:

    That runner is eye-poppingly gorgeous. It’s also mind-bendingly intricate and precise. The relationship between the two arts (crafts?) is obvious, but the complexity makes my head hurt!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Both pretty impressive, Andrew!

    Liked by 1 person

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